Signal Boost: Babylon Blues (and an update!)

Oct 28, 2019 | Progress | 2 comments

A fellow writer and friend of mine is running a Kickstarter for a short story anthology.

Babylon Blues is a unique mix of cyberpunk and Lovecraftian horror–a series of police procedurals in a post-apocalyptic city-state of war, crime, and false gods. The Kickstarter has links to some of the short stories–I can’t really do it justice with words.

So go check it out!

* * *

In personal writing news, I’m still hoping to get my current WIP finished before the end of the year, and then it’s back to C&D!

2 Comments

  1. InsaneChemist

    Any update? How did your WIP go? Looking forward to C&D 2, and I hope your life is going well. Stay healthy and sane!

    Reply
    • smithgift

      I’ve posted a short status update. More will come, hopefully, soon.

      Reply

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What to the Modern White Guy is “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”?

I have always been inspired by the story of Fredrick Douglass, a slave who escaped slavery to become a renowned orator and author. His is not the story of a man who was second-rate, shooed into the spotlight only for his relative accomplishments compared to his past. What use would that be? No, he was not merely any random speaker, but Fredrick Douglass, a name that survives to this day in history books, no matter how often it is skimmed over.

The Taste for Realism

I have seen, and admittedly indulged in that fan activity I will call the Fact Checking Game. It goes like this: First, you take some work of fiction, particularly a popular one, and you find some fascinating idea or claim it has. Then you deconstruct it with real world logic, checking all the facts and invariably coming up with an unrealistic or at least implausible conclusion. At this point, bemoaning that the creator did not think of this may commence. As a sequel, you can find some plausible counterpoint, and argue with the proponents of the former conclusion until the cows come home.

This is not, in itself, a bad thing.