What to the Modern White Guy is “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”?

I have always been inspired by the story of Fredrick Douglass, a slave who escaped slavery to become a renowned orator and author. His is not the story of a man who was second-rate, shooed into the spotlight only for his relative accomplishments compared to his past. What use would that be? No, he was not merely any random speaker, but Fredrick Douglass, a name that survives to this day in history books, no matter how often it is skimmed over.

The Taste for Realism

I have seen, and admittedly indulged in that fan activity I will call the Fact Checking Game. It goes like this: First, you take some work of fiction, particularly a popular one, and you find some fascinating idea or claim it has. Then you deconstruct it with real world logic, checking all the facts and invariably coming up with an unrealistic or at least implausible conclusion. At this point, bemoaning that the creator did not think of this may commence. As a sequel, you can find some plausible counterpoint, and argue with the proponents of the former conclusion until the cows come home.

This is not, in itself, a bad thing.

On Gratuitous Rape

This is not a happy-go-lucky post. If this subject matter disturbs you, I suggest reading something else, or perhaps waiting a few days–I plan to blog more frequently in the future.

The taste of the modern public has been, as of late, for dark and “gritty” fiction. Whether or not said fiction actually is is a subject for someone else’s post, but consider: The Hunger Games. Game of Thrones. The Malazan Book of the Fallen. The Witcher. Actually, I could rattle off a whole list of popular, dark, fiction, and invariably most of them are going to contain rape.

Status Update!

The WIP turned out to be much more of a project than I initially anticipated. I plan to get back to it after C&D2.

Smithgift’s Stuff

Blog Highlights

How many angels can, in fact, dance on the head of a pin?

The theological equivalent of xkcd’s What If? column, if you will. Yet the question, absurd or not, remains.

The Melancholy of Heaven

Are martyrs sad? Standard answer: no. They are in Heaven by definition, and “He will wipe every tear from their eyes.” I agree. Generally.

Lessons Learned from Making Educational Games for Kids

This is the first article in lessons we’ve learned, starting with the front-end design of the games themselves.

The C-x C-f Writing Method

There comes a time in every writer’s life whereupon they must stand atop the nearest soapbox, milkcrate, or indefinite cubic object to declaim how their style of writing is THE BEST.