Two new stories/August Progress Update!

Aug 28, 2017 | Behind the Scenes, Progress, Writings | 0 comments

Plenty of news in this post!

First, PRICE DROP!!1! All of my short stories are now $0.99, and The API of the Gods is now $1.99. Enjoy!

Second, I have a new story up, set in the world of C&D:

out-of-her-depth-promo

Check it out here!

Now, you might notice that I said the above story would be free, and it’s not. What gives? Simply put: Amazon’s somewhat bizarre policy of forbidding people from putting up books for free directly. As it is, I stand by its quality enough to sell it.

But if you’re still looking for a free, Sci Phi Journal has my A Fractal of Eight Tragedies in Fifteen Parts available for anyone to see. Check it out!

Meanwhile, C&D itself is still on the long road to publication. More news soon.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

What to the Modern White Guy is “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”?

I have always been inspired by the story of Fredrick Douglass, a slave who escaped slavery to become a renowned orator and author. His is not the story of a man who was second-rate, shooed into the spotlight only for his relative accomplishments compared to his past. What use would that be? No, he was not merely any random speaker, but Fredrick Douglass, a name that survives to this day in history books, no matter how often it is skimmed over.

The Taste for Realism

I have seen, and admittedly indulged in that fan activity I will call the Fact Checking Game. It goes like this: First, you take some work of fiction, particularly a popular one, and you find some fascinating idea or claim it has. Then you deconstruct it with real world logic, checking all the facts and invariably coming up with an unrealistic or at least implausible conclusion. At this point, bemoaning that the creator did not think of this may commence. As a sequel, you can find some plausible counterpoint, and argue with the proponents of the former conclusion until the cows come home.

This is not, in itself, a bad thing.