The City and the Dungeon is on Kindle Scout!1!!

Oct 18, 2017 | Progress, Writings | 0 comments

How’s this for a progress announcement?

Finally, finally, finally, I can reveal what I’ve been working on all this time. A Kindle Scout campaign for The City and the Dungeon!

the-city-and-the-dungeon-cover-800-cover-reveal-and-promotional

Kindle Scout, for the unaware, is Amazon’s trad publishing submissions system. Basically, one campaigns for nominations for thirty days and thirty nights, Amazon decides by whatever inexplicable process they like, and if they buy the rights, everyone who nominated it gets a free copy. Otherwise, nothing happens, and everyone goes on their merry way.

Which is where you come in, dear readers. By nominating my book, you might not only receive a free copy, but you’ll be helping there to be a free copy in the first place!

For those who have entirely forgotten about my book in meantime, here is the original post. In short, it’s my homage to the CRPGs and roguelikes of my youth.

So what are you waiting for? DO IT. DO IT. DOOO EEEIIIITTTT!!!

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